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Screen Savers and Welcome Screens don't resize on resolution change


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Rapid publishing

Source: Microsoft Support

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Symptom

RAPID PUBLISHING ARTICLES PROVIDE INFORMATION DIRECTLY FROM WITHIN THE MICROSOFT SUPPORT ORGANIZATION. THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS CREATED IN RESPONSE TO EMERGING OR UNIQUE TOPICS, OR IS INTENDED SUPPLEMENT OTHER KNOWLEDGE BASE INFORMATION.

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Cause

In certain scenarios where the screen resolution changes without user interaction (mouse or keyboard input), such as laptop lid closure with an external monitor attached, or an external monitor detached during standby, the screen resolution may be changed by the video driver.

If a screensaver or welcome screen is actively running during this scenario, the screen saver or welcome screen may be distorted and appear smaller or larger than the full screen resolution.

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Resolution



This issue happens because the welcome screen and default�screensaver applications that shipped with Windows do not subscribe and react to changes in the display resolution and resize themselves accordingly. This is typically not needed, because the user scenarios to change the resolution without user interaction, thus keeping the screensaver running; are not very common.

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Disclaimer



This is a display issue only and will be resolved upon user interaction such as moving the mouse or keyboard. Upon user interaction the screensaver and welcome screen will exit and resize accordingly on next start.

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Keywords: kbnomt, kbrapidpub, KB959525

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Article Info
Article ID : 959525
Revision : 2
Created on : 2/9/2009
Published on : 2/9/2009
Exists online : False
Views : 242