Notice: This website is an unofficial Microsoft Knowledge Base (hereinafter KB) archive and is intended to provide a reliable access to deleted content from Microsoft KB. All KB articles are owned by Microsoft Corporation. Read full disclaimer for more details.

ACC2000: Manipulating Objects with DAO May Cause Database Bloat


View products that this article applies to.

This article was previously published under Q197953
Advanced: Requires expert coding, interoperability, and multiuser skills.

↑ Back to the top


Symptoms

When you use Data Access Objects (DAO) to create objects in a database, the size of the database increases substantially during the operation. After compacting, the size of the database is much smaller.

Microsoft provides programming examples for illustration only, without warranty either expressed or implied. This includes, but is not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. This article assumes that you are familiar with the programming language that is being demonstrated and with the tools that are used to create and to debug procedures. Microsoft support engineers can help explain the functionality of a particular procedure, but they will not modify these examples to provide added functionality or construct procedures to meet your specific requirements.

↑ Back to the top


Resolution

Use SQL Data Definition Language (DDL) statements rather than DAO to create or modify database objects. For example, you can use the following procedure to work around the behavior demonstrated in the "Steps to Reproduce Problem" section later in this article:
Sub CreateTables()
   Dim db As Database
   Dim sql As String
   Dim i As Integer, j As Integer

   Set db = CurrentDb()
   For i = 1 To 20
      sql = "CREATE TABLE Table" & i & " ("
      For j = 1 To 200
         sql = sql & "Field" & j & " TEXT,"
      Next
      sql = Left$(sql, Len(sql) - 1) & ");"
      db.Execute sql
   Next
   Application.RefreshDatabaseWindow
End Sub
				

↑ Back to the top


Status

Microsoft has confirmed that this is a problem in the Microsoft products that are listed at the beginning of this article.

↑ Back to the top


More information

This behavior typically occurs when you use DAO to create or modify a large number of database objects. The following example demonstrates this by using DAO to create twenty tables, each with two hundred fields. In this example, reducing the number of fields created in the example greatly reduces the amount of database bloat.

Steps to Reproduce Problem

  1. Open the sample database Northwind.mdb.
  2. On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, and then click Compact And Repair Database.
  3. Press CTRL+G to open the Immediate window.
  4. Type the following in the Immediate window, and then press ENTER:
    ?FileLen(CurrentDb.Name)
    						
    This function returns the file size in bytes of the currently opened database (Northwind.mdb). Note of the current size.
  5. Create a module and type the following line in the Declarations section if it is not already there:
    Option Explicit
    					
  6. Type the following procedure:
    Sub CreateTables()
       Dim db As Database
       Dim t As TableDef
       Dim f As Field
       Dim i As Integer, j As Integer
    
       Set db = CurrentDb()
       For i = 1 To 20
          Set t = db.CreateTableDef("Table" & i)
          For j = 1 To 200
             Set f = t.CreateField("Field" & j)
             f.Type = dbText
             f.size = 50
             t.Fields.Append f
          Next
          db.TableDefs.Append t
       Next
       Application.RefreshDatabaseWindow
    End Sub
    					
  7. On the Debug menu, click Compile Northwind. When Microsoft Access prompts you for the name of the module, click OK to accept the default name.
  8. To run this procedure, type the following line in the Immediate window, and then press ENTER. It may take several minutes for this procedure to run.
    CreateTables
    						
    Note that twenty tables are added to the database, each with two hundred fields.
  9. Type the following line in the Immediate window, and then press ENTER:
    ?FileLen(CurrentDb.Name)
    						
    Note that the file size of Northwind.mdb is now reported to be more than 52 megabytes.
  10. On the Task Bar click Microsoft Access to get back to the Database window.
  11. On the Tools menu, point to Database Utilities, and then click Compact and Repair Database.
  12. Press CTRL+G to open the Immediate window.
  13. Type the following in the Immediate window, and then press ENTER:
    ?FileLen(CurrentDb.Name)
    						
    Note that the file size of Northwind.mdb after compacting is now back to the size you saw in step 4.

↑ Back to the top


References

For more information about data-definition queries, click Microsoft Access Help on the Help menu, type what is an SQL query in the Office Assistant or the Answer Wizard, and then click Search to view the topic.

↑ Back to the top


Keywords: KB197953, kbbug

↑ Back to the top

Article Info
Article ID : 197953
Revision : 3
Created on : 6/23/2005
Published on : 6/23/2005
Exists online : False
Views : 362