Notice: This website is an unofficial Microsoft Knowledge Base (hereinafter KB) archive and is intended to provide a reliable access to deleted content from Microsoft KB. All KB articles are owned by Microsoft Corporation. Read full disclaimer for more details.

"Explorer caused an invalid page fault in module MSHTML.DLL at 0137:703e34c" error message when you start Windows 95 or Windows NT with the Active Desktop enabled or when you start Internet Explorer


View products that this article applies to.

This article was previously published under Q175379
IMPORTANT: This article contains information about modifying the registry. Before you modify the registry, make sure to back it up and make sure that you understand how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For information about how to back up, restore, and edit the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
256986 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/256986/EN-US/ ) Description of the Microsoft Windows Registry
If this article does not describe the invalid page fault error message that you are receiving, view the following Microsoft Web site to view more articles that describe invalid page fault error messages in Internet Explorer:
Click here to view a list of invalid page fault articles (http://support.microsoft.com/search/default.aspx?catalog=lcid%3d1033&spid=global&query=kbieipf&adv=&mode=s&cat=false)

↑ Back to the top


Summary

When you start Windows 95 or Windows NT with the Active Desktop enabled, or when you start Internet Explorer, you may receive the following error message:
Explorer caused an invalid page fault in module MSHTML.DLL at 0137:703e34c
This error message can occur if the style sheet that specifies how Web pages are displayed in Internet Explorer is damaged, or contains an invalid command. WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.


To work around this issue, use the appropriate method:

Windows NT 4.0 with the Active Desktop Enabled

  1. Press CTRL+ALT+DELETE to open the Windows NT Security dialog box, and then click Task Manager.
  2. On the File menu, click New Task (Run...).
  3. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
  4. Locate the following registry key:
       HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main
    						
  5. Change the "Use Stylesheets" value to no.
  6. Close Registry Editor.
  7. When the Active Desktop Recovery screen appears, click Restore My Active Desktop, and then click Yes.

Windows 95 with the Active Desktop Enabled

  1. Restart Windows 95, press the F8 key when you see the "Starting Windows 95" message, and then choose Safe Mode from the Startup menu.
  2. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Internet.
  3. On the General tab, click Accessibility.
  4. Click the Format documents using my style sheet check box to clear it or type the path to a valid style sheet, click OK, and then click OK again.
  5. Restart Windows 95 normally.
  6. When the Active Desktop Recovery screen appears, click Restore My Active Desktop, and then click Yes.

Windows 95 or Windows NT with Browser Only

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click Internet.
  2. On the General tab, click Accessibility.
  3. Click the Format documents using my style sheet check box to clear it or change the path to a valid style sheet.
  4. Click OK, and then click OK again.
Re-registering the Mshtml.dll file may also resolve this issue. To re-register the Mshtml.dll file, click Start, click Run, type regsvr32.exe /i mshtml.dll, and then click OK.

↑ Back to the top


More information

A style sheet is a template that controls the formatting of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) tags on a Web page. If a style sheet is specified, the HTML tags specified in the style sheet override the browser's default setting for those tags. For example, if a Web page specifies that Internet links are displayed in blue, but you want Internet links to be displayed in black, you can specify a style sheet that formats Internet links to be displayed in black. If the style sheet contains an invalid command or action, the error message can occur when you open Internet Explorer, or when the Active Desktop is enabled.

For more information about style sheets, please see the following Microsoft Web page:

↑ Back to the top


Keywords: kbenv, kberrmsg, kbinfo, kbinvalidpagefault, KB175379

↑ Back to the top

Article Info
Article ID : 175379
Revision : 4
Created on : 8/28/2006
Published on : 8/28/2006
Exists online : False
Views : 191